Anti-Discrimination Board of NSW

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NAIDOC week celebrations 3-10 July 2016​

​Published: 30 July 2016

Great turn out throughout the week for NAIDOC events. 

NAIDOC stands for National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee. It is to celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history, culture and achievements and is an opportunity to recognise the contributions that Indigenous Australians make to our country and our society. NAIDOC Week is held in the first full week of July.

Anti-discrimination Board of NSW (ADB) was at various locations around NSW. ADB participated at flag raising ceremony at Department of Justice at Parramatta. We then kick off the celebrations at the iconic location of Luna Park at Milson’s Point. We joined in the fun at Campbelltown Community Fun Day, Newcastle, Central Coast, Riverstone, Prince of Wales Hospital at Randwick and then celebrations at Jamison Park in the greater west of Sydney and finally at Redfern National Centre of Indigenous Excellence (NCIE) family Day. ​

NAIDOC event highlights:

Picture 1: Flag raising ceremony at Department of Justice Forecourt Justice Precinct Offices Parramatta 
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Picture 2: Live performance and in the background Deputy Secretary Brendan Thomas of NSW Department of Justice
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Hyde Park showed live performances by Radical Son, Green Hand Band, Jessie Lloyd and Mi’Kaisha and Aboriginal chef Mark Olive, AKA ‘The Black Olive’, brought his signature infusions of contemporary outback flavours to NAIDOC in the City. 

​​​More details are at Sydney Destination NSW​ website.

Picture 3: Live performance at Hyde Park as people looks on during NAIDOC in the City celebrations
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Picture 4: Aboriginal group performance at Riverstone NAIDOC celebrations
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Picture 5: Celebrations at Riverstone Neighbourhood Centre
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Picture 6: Uncle Max an Aboriginal elder at sacred smoking ceremony - Redfern NCIE Family Day​
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A sacred smoking ceremony has many purposes but often it is used as a welcome to a particular area and /or it may cleanse an area or person and shows a sign of respect for people past and present and also the passing over of elders – to rest the spirit. 



Picture 7: ADB staff with an Aboriginal elder – Uncle Max at NCIE, Redfern
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